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2021 News/Photos

Sweetwater DAR Honors Veterans Through Wreaths Across America

By Richard Grant FOR THE SENTINEL

November 22, 2021

Wreath-laying ceremonies will take place Dec. 18 at Arlington National Cemetery and at more than 2,500 additional locations in all 50 U.S. states, at sea and abroad for Wreaths Across America. The Sweetwater Chapter of Daughters of American Revolution is affiliated with Georgia National Cemetery in Canton.Wreaths Across America/Special Photo
Every year on what is designated by Congress as National Wreaths Across America Day, the goal to Remember, Honor and Teach about military veterans is carried out by coordinating wreath-laying ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery, as well as at more than 2,500 additional locations in all 50 U.S. states, at sea and abroad.
On Dec.18, at 9 a.m., Wreaths Across America will be at cemetery locations across the state, to remember and honor veterans through the laying of Remembrance wreaths on the graves of our country’s military veterans.
Sue Carlton, vice regent of the Sweetwater Chapter of Daughters of American Revolution (DAR), is very involved and was contacted by phone.
Carlton said the Sweetwater Chapter of DAR is affiliated primarily with the Georgia National Cemetery (GANCCA) in Canton at 1080 Veterans Cemetery Road, which lists 16,100 vets interred.
The WAA goal of ‘remembrance, honor and teach’ aligns with that of the DAR Carlton said, “... to honor the men and women who achieved American independence and promote the development of an enlightened public opinion and sponsor patriotic citizenship.”
The laying of wreaths ceremony is a deliberate process done respectfully and not brusque, or as an afterthought, Carlton explained.“The wreath is laid and that veteran’s name is said aloud with their service. Then the volunteer will step back and pause for a moment. If that volunteer is military, they may also salute,” she said.
“We’re also involved at the Marietta cemetery,” Carlton said.
Many there at Marietta are Civil War. According to Congress, all from the Civil War are veterans, Carlton said.
In addition to Canton, there are five other Georgia cemetery locations involved and listed on the WAA website at www.wreathsacros america.org, including West Georgia Memorial Park at 4194 Carrollton Villa Rica Hwy. in Carrollton.
And according to the WAA website information, “If you don’t see a location near you, Wreaths Across America will support you in becoming a Location Coordinator for a cemetery in your area. There is no cost to become a participating location and host a Wreaths Across America ceremony.”
The story behind how the program came to be is also provided at the WAA website.
“The donation of wreaths from the Worcester Wreath Co. of Harrington, Maine, began as a personal tribute from the Worcester family to military veterans who gave their lives for this country. The family quietly made these wreath donations to Arlington National Cemetery for nearly 15 years before a photo set them on a path they hadn’t dreamed about.
The photo — of the company’s wreaths at Arlington covered in snow — went viral in 2006. Shortly thereafter, the Worcester Wreath Co. began receiving unsolicited money from people who wanted to participate by sponsoring wreaths themselves. Because there was no mechanism in place for the family to accept the donations, money was returned to donors.
In 2007, the Worcester family, along with veterans, and other groups and individuals who had helped with their annual veterans’ wreath ceremony in Arlington, formed Wreaths Across America, a non-profit 501©(3) organization, to continue and expand this effort.
In 2008, over 300 locations held wreath-laying ceremonies in every state, Puerto Rico and 24 overseas cemeteries. Over 100,000 wreaths were placed on veterans’ graves. Over 60,000 volunteers participated. And that year, Dec. 13 was unanimously voted by the U.S. Congress as “Wreaths Across America Day.
In 2014, Wreaths Across America and its national network of volunteers laid over 700,000 memorial wreaths at 1,000 locations in the U.S. and beyond, including ceremonies at the Pearl Harbor Memorial, as well as Bunker Hill, Valley Forge and the sites of the Sept. 11 tragedies. This was accomplished with help from 2,047 sponsorship groups, corporate contributions, and donations of trucking, shipping, and thousands of helping hands. The organization’s goal of covering Arlington National Cemetery was met in 2014 with the placement of 226,525 wreaths.”
While coordinating wreath-laying ceremonies in December is a big part of what WAA does, their mission is carried out throughout the year. From the Remembrance Tree program to the Wreaths Across America Museum in Maine, there are many different ways to get involved. WAA also participates in veterans’ events throughout the year, and has a veteran liaison on staff to work with local veterans organizations.
The deadline for donations is Nov. 30. Anyone who cares to make a donation locally can do so by visiting https://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/pages/45270 or calling Sue Carlton at 404-502-6611.

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Bench Dedicated in Honor of Heard County Veterans

November 13, 2021

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20th Anniversary Celebration of Chapter Founding


On Saturday, October 9, 2021, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter of SAR. Chapter members and members of local DAR chapters, and their spouses, gathered at Atlanta's Finest Catering in Douglasville for a nice dinner, speeches, and conversation.
Long-time President George Wheeless had previously announced to the chapter that he would be stepping down as president. At the end of the evening, George reiterated his intention to step down and passed the gavel to Vice President Jim Swinson, who is now the chapter president. George's leadership will be missed. He did an outstanding job leading the chapter. Jim will no doubt do the same.
Here are some photos from the event:
Left and below: President George Wheeless presenting the Lydia Darragh Medal to his wife, Cathie, for providing significant service to him during his terms in office and working behind the scenes supporting SAR programs.
Below: President George Wheeless passing the gavel to Vice President and new President Jim Swinson:
Below is new Chapter President Jim Swinson:
The photo below is of the chapter members present for the anniversary event. Seated, left to right: Dick Whitten and Greg Goggans. Standing, left to right: Ronnie Pate, Norman Alter, Jim Rowell, Jim Swinson, George Wheeless, and Mike Campbell.

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Carrollton 2021 4th of July Parade


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, members of the chapter and the D.A.R. participated in the Carrollton Fourth of July Parade. As usual, the Chapter had a float in the parade and was positioned near the front of the procession. In the photo above: Back row left to right: Tina Clune, Mary Mallory, Sandy Vierling, and Alice Robinson. Front row left to right: Jim Swinson, Mike Campbell (both in Continental uniform), George Wheeless, Jim Rowell, Norman Alter, and Dick Whitten (militia attire).

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DCHS grad Bogstie to join Space Force

SPECIAL TO THE SENTINEL Nov 30, 2020 Updated Jan 7, 2021

Douglas County Sentinel

Colonel Heather B. Bogstie
U.S. Air Force Col. Heather Brandt Bogstie, a 1994 graduate of Douglas County High School, is joining the Space Force at Los Angeles Air Force Base in California in February of 2021.
Bogstie is currently the Senior Material Leader of the Rapid Development Division within the Space and Missiles Systems Center’s (SMC) Development Corps at the LA AFB annex.
In this capacity, Bogstie oversees a 64 person team executing a 13 program, $800 million portfolio critical to the nation’s endowment of rapid response to known and emerging space threats.
Her division focuses on rapidly inserting and exploring on-orbit emerging capabilities and architectures and delivering to warfighters.
Her portfolio includes partnerships with over 425 U.S. companies in the Space Enterprise Consortium, the national labs, and coalition partners, all driven by the singular focus of rapidly advancing the next generation of space innovation and capabilities to the warfighter, thereby enabling a resilient national space enterprise.
Prior to this role, she led the SMC workforce of 6,000 personnel through a crucial transition to a new organizational structure designed to accelerate delivery of space capabilities and execute innovative new concepts.
Bogstie earned an electrical engineering degree in 1998 at Auburn University and received her commission in the Air Force as a scholarship student.
She was commissioned in 1998 through the ROTC program at Auburn. Her first assignment was a Minuteman III missile operator/instructor/flight chief at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota. She then moved to the Air Force Technical Applications Center at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, as a systems engineer for the Nuclear Treaty Monitoring Directorate, upgrading and installing 15 seismic stations spanning all seven continents.
Afterwards, she became the Chief of Payload Products, Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) Wing at Los Angeles AFB, delivering the critical SBIRS GEO-2 missile detection and warning payload for spacecraft integration. After attending Air Command and Staff College, she was a Political Military Planner in the Western Hemisphere Directorate of J5, The Joint Staff, Pentagon, coordinating Defense Support of Civil Authorities and Pandemic Influenza and Infectious Disease policies with interagency partners. She followed that assignment as Chief, Space Vehicle Engineering Branch at the National Reconnaissance Office where she led a 1,500-member joint team for $4.3 billion-plus SIGINT space vehicle development.
She then became Material Leader for Space Operations with SMC’s Advanced Systems and Development Directorate at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, and led the $152 million RDT&E Support Complex, operating $672 million in Department of Defense NASA missions. While there she was dual-hatted as Program Manager for the $94 million ORS-5 mission which successfully launched in August 2017 delivering a space situational awareness capability to the warfighter and pathfinding technology for future space systems.
Following that successful tour, she moved to Los Angeles AFB to become Chief of the SMC Commanders Action Group, leading a high performing team that directly supported the Commander and Center leaders through various high profile efforts and events.She recently received an award for Outstanding Air Force Acquisitions Staff Officer (Military), Commander’s Action Group, Air Force Space Command, El Segundo, Calif.
Bogstie is a current member of the local Sweetwater Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.She is the daughter of Michael and Penny Brandt of Douglasville.
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May 15, 2021 Memorial Service for Compatriot Hugh Will Barrow (Bill)

May 25, 1926 – May 6, 2020


Where: Bowdon City Cemetery, 450 West Avenue, Bowdon, Georgia
Order of Service:
Posting of the Colors – Casimir Pulaski Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution.
Procession - Family, Reverend Patton, Sons of the American Revolution, Sons of Confederate Veterans, American Legion, Eagle Scouts.
Reverend Patton – Opening prayer
“In the Garden” - Carrolltones
Reverend Patton – Introduction and summary remarks
United States Navy Hymn – Carrolltones
“How Great Thou Art” - Carrolltones
Sons of the American Revolution - Presentation of Wreath, Service Medal
Sons of Confederate Veterans
Eagle Scouts - Pledge
American Legion - Presentation of Flag, Taps, Gun Salute
Reverend Patton – Closing Prayer
“Anchors Aweigh” - Carrolltones----------

Junior ROTC Award Presented by SAR

Alexander High School

April 10, 2021


On Tuesday, April 20, 2021, Casimir Pulaski Chapter member Ed Carlton presented the Junior ROTC Award from the chapter at the Alexander High School, Douglasville, Georgia, Honors Day program. Also in attendance for the chapter was member Greg Goggans.
In photo above, Casimir Pulaski Chapter member Ed Carlton and an Alexander High School JROTC member.

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2020 News/Photos

Sweetwater DAR Recognizes Local Students

  • By Sue Carlton Special to the Douglas County Sentinel

  • Apr 21, 2020

The high school group, from left to right are: Capt. J.T. McMurtrie, Senior Naval Science Instructor at Chapel Hill High School; Madison Halie Woods, 2020 DAR Good Citizen of Chapel Hill High School; Kemelyn Hernandez-Alvarado, 2020 DAR Good Citizen of Douglas County High School; Sydney Brandon, 2020 Good Citizen of Alexander High School and 2020 DAR Sweetwater Chapter Good Citizen Winner; Sage Crystian, 2020 Good Citizen of New Manchester High School; and Whitney Swift, AP United States History, Honors United States History, Honors American Government Social Studies Department Chair New Manchester High School. Not pictured is Brandon Chase Wilson, 2020 Good Citizen of Lithia Springs High School.
Pictured, front row, from left: Cameron Blount; Natalie Boberg, 5th Grade American History Essay Winner and third place winner in District, Imani Grandoit. Back row, Rochelle Davis, Sweetwater DAR Chair, Mrs. Williams and Ms. Jenkins. Not pictured is Helen Pahno, Christopher Columbus Essay winner and DAR NW District Winner from Saint John of Kronstadt Homeschool 12 Grade.
The Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) recently presented American history certificates, the Christopher Columbus Award and certificate and recognized the Good Citizen from each high school.The purpose of the American History Essay Contest is to promote American history throughout the year by honoring significant historical people, places, dates, and events.The Sweetwater Chapter does this by sponsoring the American History Essay Contest and the Christopher Columbus Essay Contest. In many instances, the two essay contests provide an additional opportunity for teachers to reach out beyond the existing curriculum.Earlier this school year the Sweetwater Chapter delivered essay instructions which included the topic for this year’s essay entrants to every school in Douglas County. Students in grades five through eight in public, private, or parochial school, or those who are home schooled are eligible.Christopher Columbus Essay ContestSince 1996, the NSDAR has joined with the National Italian American Foundation to sponsor an annual national essay contest on Christopher Columbus. This contest is open to students in grades nine through 12 in public, private, or parochial schools, or those who are home schooled.• Chapters select one essay as the chapter winner. Chapters may award all participants in the Christopher Columbus Essay Contest a Christopher Columbus Essay Certificate. Bronze Medals are not awarded for this contest.• At the state level, one Christopher Columbus essay is selected and a state-level certificate is presented, plus any other awards at the discretion of the state.
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Remodeling of Casimir Pulaski Chapter SAR Meeting Room

in the Veterans Building in Carrollton


Here are a few pictures of the room provided by Mike Campbell. Thanks to Jim Swinson for much of the remodeling, furniture, and labor. Thanks to Gerald and Shane Lyle for the donation of the flooring. We are looking forward to having the room finished soon.
Meeting table with Washington flag in background.
Revolutionary War flags posted at entrance.
Below: Posted flags from view of meeting table toward door.
Below: Signing table with memorial plaque.
Above: Sitting area in back corner.
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July 3, 2020

Carroll County, Georgia's Revolutionary War Soldiers

George Wheeless with the names of American Revolutionary soldiers who later lived in the frontier that became Carroll County. See "Carroll County's Revolutionary War Soldiers" article below.
Thomas Hinesley was born in Maryland and served in the North Carolina Continental Line. He served five tours, rising in rank from private to colonel, and in 1834, he filed for a pension in Carroll County, the same year he died. See "Carroll County's Revolutionary War Soldiers" article below.

Carroll County's Revolutionary War Soldiers

This article was written by Ken Denney and published in The Times-Georgian Newspaper on July 3, 2020.


In America’s war for independence, there were not only uniformed soldiers of two opposing armies, there were also rag-tag militias; groups of neighbors and farmers, some who were loyal to the King of England, others who were patriots of a new American republic.
James Alexander Goggans, originally from Virginia, was one of those revolutionary Americans, and he was nobody’s sunshine patriot. Wounded in the shoulder at the Battle of Kings Mountain in South Carolina, he was injured in the leg shortly afterward.
Then, during another pitched battle, he was whacked over the head with a saber and left for dead. Each time he eventually picked himself up and got back into the fight.
Forty-three years after the Revolution ended, Goggans, now 68, made his way down to Georgia. It was 1826, and the Legislature of the new state had just created a new county out of Creek lands. They called it Carroll.
Goggans was one of at least 17 Revolutionary War soldiers who moved to Carroll County in the years after the war, men whose biographies are being sketched together by local researcher George Wheeless.
A genealogist and president of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, Wheeless and other patriotic groups have had the names of those soldiers carved in stone at the Carroll County Veterans Memorial Park. They’ve left room for more names, because Wheeless is still researching — and believes he will identify more.
About 250,000 men served as regulars or militiamen for the Revolutionary cause, but experts say there were never more than 90,000 soldiers under arms at any one time.
When the war was over, these former soldiers traveled across the former colonies in search of new homes, or followed their families into the frontier. Wherever they went, they were venerated and honored for their fight to make the country free.
Wheeless’ task is more complicated than it might appear. Finding these men involves careful researching through census records, war pension applications and land deeds. What’s more, locating these people within the confines of Carroll County is difficult because the boundaries of the county have shifted and evolved.
A treaty with the Creeks signed in 1825 led the Legislature to divide former Indian lands in western Georgia into five sections. In its earliest incarnation, Carroll County was pizza shaped. Its southern border followed the Chattahoochee River from near what is now Six Flags, southwesterly to what is now West Point. Its northern border stretched from Six Flags to the Alabama border northwest of Buchanan in Haralson County. Later, the territory was carved up into Campbell (later Douglas) and Heard counties, and parts of what are now Haralson and Troup counties.
Wheeless has been looking at the records of all those counties to find out more about these old soldiers, and this is what he has come up with:
Jesse Rowell may have had the most storied career of all the veterans. He served as a private in the First Regiment North Carolina Continental Line. He fought in the battles of Brandywine (September 1777) and Germantown (October 1777), both in Pennsylvania, and Monmouth (June 1778) in New Jersey. He was with Washington’s army at Valley Forge. During the British siege of Charlestown (South Carolina) in 1780, he was taken prisoner and spent the remaining years of the war in a “prison ship” in Charlestown Harbor. He died after 1840 in Carroll County.
John Barber, who was born in 1767 and served as a private in the Third Regiment, Maryland Continental Line. He filed for a pension in the State Court of Carroll County, and died after October 1840.
John Carmichael, who was originally from Pennsylvania and served in the First and Second Battalions of the Pennsylvania Continental Line. By 1836 he was living in Carroll County near present day Tallapoosa. He died in 1848.
James Alexander Goggans, who, after moving to Carroll County in 1826, briefly relocated to Alabama, then returned here, where he became active at what is now Bethany Christian Church on the Carrollton-Villa Rica Road. He was buried there in 1852.
Peter Helton, who was born in North Carolina and served as a first lieutenant under that state’s forces commanded by Gen. Nathaniel Greene. He was severely wounded three times in the Battle of Eutaw Springs (September 1781), which left him permanently disabled.
Thomas Hinesley, was born in Maryland and served in the North Carolina Continental Line. He served five tours, rising in rank from private to colonel, and in 1834, he filed for a pension in Carroll County, the same year he died.
Lazarus Hinson, born in Virginia, also served in North Carolina as a militiaman. He was at the Battle of Camden, South Carolina (August 1780), though saw no action.
Nimrod Jones, like some of these other soldiers, was granted land in a state lottery that divided up former Creek and Cherokee lands. The state allowed him three draws in the lottery, based on their oath that they had served in the Revolution. His draw brought him to Carroll County, where he was elected coroner in 1843.
Minor Mead entered military service in the Sixth Regiment of Virginia militia. The 1830 census showed that he was living in Carroll County, and he died here on March 25, 1837.
Jesse Peters was already in Georgia when the war began. He served as a private in the Third Georgia Continental Regiment and was present at three battles in east Georgia and South Carolina. He filed for a pension in the State Court of Carroll County in 1832.
Levi Phillips, Sr. was born on September 20, 1751, in Cecil County, Maryland. He was living in Rowan Co. North Carolina when he enlisted in a regiment of the Rowan County Militia. In 1828 he was living in Carroll County where he applied for a pension in the State Court of Carroll County in 1831. He died January 14,1840.
John Robinson, Sr. was born on July 11, 1752, in Hanover County, Virginia. When the Revolutionary War started, he was living in Chatham Co. North Carolina. He served in the Fourth and Fifth regiments of the North Carolina Militia.
Gabriel Smith was born in Montgomery County, North Carolina, on December 12, 1764. He served in the Montgomery County Regiment of Militia. In the fall of 1781 he was taken prisoner by some Tories (British loyalists), but after about 3 weeks he escaped. He died in Carroll County in 1841.
Zachariah Stedham was born in 1751 in South Carolina. He served with the South Carolina Troops under the command of Col. Wade Hampton and General Nathaniel Greene. He fought at the Battle of Eutaw Springs, where he was wounded in the face and lost sight in his left eye. He died after 1840.
William York was born in 1755 probably in North Carolina. He enlisted in September of 1776 as a private in the First Regiment North Carolina Continental Line. He fought at the battles of Moore’s Creek Bridge (North Carolina), Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth, then was taken prisoner at the Siege of Charlestown in 1780. William died in Carroll County on July 14, 1837.
William Meryman was born in Virginia, but was living in Granville County, North Carolina, when the Revolutionary War began. He enlisted in the Caswell County Regiment of Militia and fought in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse (March 1781) in North Carolina. In March of 1834 he filed a petition for a pension in the State Court of Carroll County.
Tobias Honea (pronounced Honey) was born in North Carolina and enlisted as a private in the New Bern District Brigade of Militia. Over the course of the war, he served in three other militia units in eastern North Carolina. Tobias died about December 25th 1840.
Although the territory that is now Carroll County was owned by the Creeks and was far from the cockpit of war during the Revolution, it became home — sometimes briefly — to these soldiers, who sought new lives in the land they had set free.
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Sweetwater DAR celebrates Flag Day

By Ron Daniel-Editor

Jun 16, 2020 Updated Dec 24, 2020

Douglas County Sentinel

Above: Sweetwater DAR member Sia Pahno and her son Michael participated in a Memorial Day Moment of Remembrance with Lt. Col. Michael Brandt (Retired Army) and his wife Penny Brandt, also a member of the Sweetwater Chapter DAR, in the Brandt's neighborhood. Sia played Taps on the bugle. The DAR celebrated Flag Day on Sunday.
Sue Carlton/SpecialSue Carlton, regent for the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), said that while COVID-19 made celebrating Flag Day on Sunday more difficult, it is important for people to still remember what the American flag means to them.
“It was flown in battles all over this world, and it still stands on the moon,” Carlton said.
Carlton said that in 2008, Congress approved the first Braille flag and the Sweetwater Chapter of DAR presented a Douglas County third-grader with a Braille flag and copies of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.
“Due to the virus this year, many of our celebrations will be trimmed from the calendar,” Carlton said. “I’m always proud to see the flags hanging from house walls, mailboxes or gates or on utility poles on city and county streets. Although we are not having a ceremony or a Fourth of July parade this year, we can still be proud of the flag of our nation and perhaps do small community parades.”
Another suggestion Carlton had is to go to cemeteries and put small flags beside the graves of veterans. She noted that some flags had been stolen from the graves of local veterans recently.
“These veterans took our flag with them wherever they were sent and saluted it properly and proudly,” Carlton said.
The History Channel website notes that when the American Revolution broke out in 1775, the colonists weren’t fighting under a single flag. On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress took a break from writing the Articles of Confederation and passed a resolution stating the “flag of the United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white” and that “the union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.”
In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson marked the anniversary of that decree by officially establishing June 14 as Flag Day.
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2020: Certificates, Awards, Streamers, Flags, and Pins

Above: Compatriot Orrill Morris presented with 15 year pin and certificate.
Above: President George Wheeless and Sergeant-at-Arms Norman Alter displaying the streamers awarded to the Pulaski Chapter at the 2020 annual state meeting of the Sons of the American Revolution.
Above: Bob Hilliard Recipient of 2020 Distinguished Service Award and Medal.
Right: Vice President Jim Swinson at the unveiling of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter Memorial plaque.
Left: July 4th Patriotic display of Revolutionary War flags by Compatriot Mike Campbell.
Right: SAR logo.
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2019 News/Photos

'Daughters' celebrate Constitution Day

  • By Krystal Horne Staff Writer Douglas County Sentinel

  • Sep 19, 2019 Updated Dec 24, 2020

Mason Creek Elementary School Teacher Sadisha Clark, far right, watches as third-grader Caleigh Caston reads from a Braille copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution presented to her by Sweetwater Daughters of the American Revolution Sue Carlton during a Constitution Day assembly at the school on Tuesday. Krystal Horne/Douglas County Sentinel
Members of the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Casimir Pulaski Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution handed out copies of the American Constitution in front of the Douglas County Courthouse on Tuesday morning to commemorate Constitution Day. From left: Sweetwater DAR Regent Sue Carlton, Richard Whitten, Marge Schulhof, Mike Campbell, Jo Ann Colquitt, Linda Wilson and Karen Flagg. Krystal Horne/Douglas County Sentinel.
Decked out in colonial-era attire, members of the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) along with the Casimir Pulaski Chapter Sons of the American Revolution from Carrollton commemorated Constitution Day by handing out free pocket-sized Constitutions, a Flag Code, Pledge of Allegiance, and America’s Creed Cards.
According to Sue Carlton, regent for the Sweetwater Chapter, over 200 pocket copies of the Constitution were handed out on Tuesday.
Carlton said Douglas County Commission Chairman Romona Jackson Jones was among those who stopped by.
“We had quite a few people stop by, go into the courthouse, and stop by again on their way out,” said Carlton.
Earlier in the day at an assembly at Mason Creek Elementary, Carlton shared several unknown facts with both teachers and students about the Constitution—including information on Jacob Shallus, the penman of the original copy of the United States Constitution. The handwritten document that Shallus penned is currently on display at the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.
Towards the end of the assembly, Carlton presented a Braille copy of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution— documents that forged America’s identity— to Caleigh Caston, a visually impaired third grader. Additionally, Caston also received a copy of the flag featuring the Pledge of Allegiance, information on the flag colors, and the number of stars and stripes—all in Braille form.
Later Tuesday, the Sweetwater DAR chapter was presented with a proclamation declaring Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week at the Board of Commissioners regular voting meeting.
The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) started this celebration of the Constitution, after petitioning Congress to set aside September 17-23 annually to be dedicated for the observance of Constitution Week in 1955. The resolution was later adopted by the U.S. Congress and signed into public law by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on August 2, 1955.
As part of Constitution Week, Constitution Day is also known as Citizenship Day, due to many naturalization ceremonies taking place, according to Carlton.
They have been the foremost advocate for the awareness, promotion, and celebration of Constitution Week. This annual observance, which marks the signing of the Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, provides countless opportunities for educational initiatives and community outreach— two mission areas that are important to the group.
One of the largest patriotic women’s organizations in the world, DAR has more than 185,000 members in approximately 3,000 chapters across the country and internationally.
Founded on Oct. 11, 1890, the lineage-based service organization offers membership to women who are direct descendants of a person involved in the country’s efforts towards independence.
Any woman 18 years or older who can prove lineal, bloodline descent from an ancestor who aided in achieving American independence is eligible to join the DAR. She must provide documentation for each statement of birth, marriage, and death, as well as of the Revolutionary War service of her Patriot ancestor.
For additional information about DAR and its programs, including scholarships, visit www.dar.org.
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DAR Promotes Constitution Week; Sweetwater Chapter Giving Out Free Copies at DC Courthouse on Sept. 17

  • Sep 5, 2019 Updated Dec 24, 2020

  • Douglas County Sentinel

Photo above: Members of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter Sons of the American Revolution and the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution handed out copies of the U.S. Constitution in front of the Douglas County Courthouse last year to commemorate Constitution Day. From left are Dick Whitten, Jim Swinson, Elaine Rollins, Mike Campbell and Bob Hilliard.
Special members of the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution are Penny Brandt, Karen Flagg, Jo Ann Colquitt, Kathy Goggans, Marge Schulhof, Sue Carlton and Lora Lykins.


There are two documents of paramount importance to American history: the Declaration of Independence, which forged our national identity, and the United States Constitution, which set forth the framework for the federal government that is still in use today. While Independence Day is a beloved national holiday, fewer people know about Constitution Week, an annual commemoration of the living document that upholds and protects the freedoms central to our American way of life. This year, the annual celebration begins Sept. 17, 2019.The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) initiated the observance in 1955, when the organization petitioned the U.S. Congress to dedicate September 17–23 of each year to the commemoration of Constitution Week. Congress adopted the resolution, and on Aug. 2, 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed it into Public Law #915. The celebration’s goals are threefold: to encourage the study of the historical events that led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787; to inform people that the Constitution is the basis of America’s great heritage and the foundation of our way of life; and to emphasize U.S. citizens’ responsibility to protect, defend and preserve the Constitution.The Sweetwater Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution and the Casimir Pulaski Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution of Carrollton will be in front of the Douglas County Courthouse on Tuesday, Sept. 17, from 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. handing out free pocket Constitutions, Flag Code, Pledge of Allegiance Cards and the America’s Creed Cards.Sue Carlton, regent for the Sweetwater Chapter, urges residents to stop by the Douglas County Courthouse to pick up a copy of the Constitution.The Sweetwater Chapter meets the second Sunday each month at 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church on Campbellton St. Visitors are always welcome, Carlton said.DAR has been the foremost advocate for the awareness, promotion and celebration of Constitution Week. This annual observance provides innumerable opportunities for educational initiatives and community outreach, two mission areas of crucial importance to the National Society’s work. By fostering knowledge of and appreciation for the Constitution and the inalienable rights it affords to all Americans, DAR helps to keep alive the memory of the men and women who secured our nation’s independence, whose bravery and sacrifice made possible the liberties we enjoy today.“The framers created a Constitution that translated into law the ideals upon which our nation was built,” said DAR President General Denise Doring VanBuren. “Their vision was so forward thinking that their words still guide us today. No American history education can be complete without a thorough understanding of the impact the Constitution has had on the lives of American citizens past and present.”One of the largest patriotic women’s organizations in the world, DAR has more than 185,000 members in approximately 3,000 chapters across the country and even in numerous foreign countries. DAR strives to promote historic preservation, education and patriotism via commemorative events, scholarships and educational initiatives, citizenship programs, service to veterans, meaningful community service, and more. For additional information about DAR and its programs, visit www.dar.org.
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DAR ready for Constitution Day on Sept. 17

By Krystal Horne staff writer Douglas County Sentinel

Sep 14, 2019 Updated Dec 24, 2020

Above photo: Krystal Horne/Douglas County SentinelRetired Air Force Col. Patricia Harrington, DAR Regent Sue Carlton, and DAR Historian Jo Ann Greene Fowler of the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) urge residents and visitors to stop by the Douglas County Courthouse on Tuesday morning for the annual Constitution Day celebration, commemorating the anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution.

The Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), along with the Sons of the American Revolution, will be dressed up in colonial attire on Tuesday morning to celebrate the of the signing of the United States Constitution, a document that set forth the framework for the federal government that is still vital today.
“We try to promote patriotism,” said Sweetwater Chapter Regent Sue Carlton.
The groups will be in front of the Douglas County Courthouse handing out free pocket Constitutions, Flag Code, Pledge of Allegiance Cards and America’s Creed Cards on Tuesday, Sept. 17, from 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Carlton urges residents to stop by the Douglas County Courthouse to pick up a copy of the Constitution.
The DAR began the observance of Constitution Day in 1955 when the organization petitioned the U.S. Congress to dedicate Sept. 17-23 of each year to the commemoration of Constitution Week. Congress adopted the resolution on Aug. 2, 1956, and then-President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed it into public law.
According to Carlton, it is also known as Citizenship Day, due to many naturalization ceremonies taking place. In addition to handing out pocket Constitutions, the local chapter will also be donating a Braille form of the Constitution to a visually impaired third-grade student during an assembly at Mason Creek Elementary School on Constitution Day. The student will also receive Braille American flag.
“This is sort of helpful teaching aid,” Carlton said.
The first local DAR was first organized with 18 members on March 29, 1921. The chapter was soon named Ama-Kanasta—which translates to “sweet water” in English—in honor of the Cherokee Indian Chief. The Sweetwater Chapter will be in attendance at the next Board of Commissioners' meeting later that night, where a proclamation will be presented, declaring Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week.
The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) was founded on Oct. 11, 1890. The lineage-based service organization offers membership to women who are direct descendants of a person involved in the country’s efforts towards independence.
Any woman 18 years or older who can prove lineal, bloodline descent from an ancestor who aided in achieving American independence is eligible to join the DAR. She must provide documentation for each statement of birth, marriage, and death, as well as of the Revolutionary War service of her Patriot ancestor.
With 185,000 members and 3,000 chapters nationally and internationally, the DAR strives to promote historic preservation, education and patriotism via commemorative events, scholarships and educational initiatives, and more.
For additional information about DAR and its programs, visit www.dar.org.
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September 9, 2019: Dedication of the Charles Carroll Portrait


The Casimir Pulaski Chapter of the Georgia Society Sons of the American Revolution made a significant donation to the citizens of Carroll County, Georgia, to honor the history of Carroll County. The photographs below are from the unveiling.
Carroll County Commission Chairperson, Michelle Morgan accepts the Charles Carroll portrait on behalf of the citizens of Carroll County after the unveiling along with Chapter Secretary/Treasurer Mike Campbell. Photo above right:
Charles Carroll portrait: L to R: Ronnie Pate, Orrill Morris, Richard Whitten, Mike Campbell, Reid Walker, Ralph Van Pelt (Artist), Jim Swinson, George Wheeless, Ed Carlton, and Jim Rowell.
About the two photos above: The Casimir Pulaski Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, based in Carrollton, Georgia, presented to the citizens of Carroll County a portrait of Revolutionary Period Patriot Charles Carroll of Carrollton. While Charles Carroll of Carrollton lived in Maryland, and never visited Georgia, his dedication to the independence effort gained him notoriety across the country with many counties and cities named after him.
Charles Carroll of Carrollton (1737-1832) was a signer of the Declaration of Independence from Maryland. He was the last survivor of all 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence, dying in 1832 in his 96th year. Six years before the time of his death, the western part of Georgia was opened up to settlers, many of them veterans of the Revolutionary War. To honor the Patriot Charles Carroll, the county of Carroll was carved out of this rugged west Georgia frontier. The county seat of Carrollton was named after the estate of Charles Carroll’s home in Maryland.
The Casimir Pulaski Chapter sought the services of a local artist to create an original portrait to present to the citizens of Carroll County. Artist Ralph Van Pelt, of Carrollton, was chosen to create the portrait, and period framing was performed by Carrollton resident Jan Nielsen.
On September 9, 2019 a formal presentation was made by the Casimir Pulaski Chapter to the citizens of Carroll County, Georgia. A large number of Casimir Pulaski Chapter members attended the presentation in the historic Carroll County Courthouse in Carrollton, Georgia. Carroll County Commission Chair Michelle Morgan accepted the portrait on behalf of the citizens of Carroll County, and the Carroll County Commission. The historic presentation was made 193 years and three months after the establishment of Carroll County. This is the first portrait of Charles Carroll of Carrollton to be displayed in the Historic Carroll County Court House in Carrollton, Georgia. The portrait is now on display in the grand hallway of the historic Carroll County Courthouse in Carrollton, Georgia.
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2017 News/Photos

Honoring American Patriots

By Laura Camper (lcamper@gateway-beacon) in the Douglas County Sentinel

May 11, 2017

Jesse Rowell was one of two American Revolutionary War veterans honored in a marker dedication ceremony in Tallapoosa on Saturday.
Jim Rowell, great-great-great-great grandson of American patriot Jesse Rowell, had a chance to brag about his family on Saturday at a marker dedication ceremony in Tallapoosa.
The ceremony was to honor his ancestor and Jesse Peters, who were both American Revolutionary War veterans.“We wouldn’t have this country if it weren’t for people like that,” Jim Rowell said before the ceremony. “They were giving up everything; they could lose their homes. They could be tried for treason. They felt strongly enough to really put their lives on the line.”
He’d heard stories about Jesse Rowell all his life, Jim Rowell said. His grandfather and father told stories about him and his mother did research about the patriot’s life, he said.
Jesse Rowell served in the Continental Army for four years and survived a British prisoner ship in Charleston Harbor after being captured during the siege of Charleston in 1779. He was extremely tough, Jim Rowell said. In his 80s, the elderly Rowell wanted to see Texas and loaded up a wagon, hitched it to oxen and made the long trip there with family. Once there, he decided he didn’t like it and came back to his home in Haralson County, Jim Rowell said with a laugh. Jesse Rowell lived to 102 and was buried in what is now Haralson County in 1850 in the Rowell-Philpott Cemetery. That property is now private and is not recognizable as a grave, Jim Rowell said.
The memorial ceremony, sponsored by the Casimir Pulaski Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Tallapoosa Historical Society, was held at Sparrow Chapel in Tallapoosa, where the two markers are located. It drew dozens of people from all over the area including a good number dressed in period uniforms and clothing.
George Wheeless, president of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, attended in full Continental Army uniform. He said the ceremony to honor the two patriots was organized after the chapter recently discovered that the markers were there. The markers were placed at the Sparrow Chapel by the Tallapoosa Historical Society in about 2000, Wheeless said.
In absence of a descendent of Jesse Peters, Wheeless delivered the patriot’s biography during the ceremony.
Jesse Peters was born in North Carolina, but moved to Georgia before the Revolutionary War. He served in the Continental Army from 1776 to 1779. He lived in Wilkes, Oglethorpe and Walton counties in Georgia. He moved to Carroll County with his son, William, in 1831 and died in 1839 at about the age of 87, Wheeless said. No one knows exactly where Jesse Peters was buried, Wheeless said.
“A resident of Carroll County, it is now believed he was buried in an unmarked grave on the land then owned by his son,” he said.The ceremony included presentations of wreaths at the markers, a musket salute, and “Taps” played on the bugle by Bill Palmer, a member of the Button Gwinnett Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution.
Many of the people gathered said they were here to honor the patriotism Jesse Rowell and Jesse Peters displayed in their service.Lane Brooks, of the Sweetwater Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, said members of her chapter came to the ceremony to take part in something that is bigger than themselves.
“To show gratitude to those who have given everything so that we can live the lives that we have today,” Brooks added.
Sue Carlton, regent of the Sweetwater Chapter, agreed. The group supports historic preservation and works with two schools: one in Grant, Alabama, and one in Georgia, as part of their mission, she said.
“We want to educate everybody to support patriotism,” Carlton said.
Some also noted that it’s important to remember our nation’s history.
“A country that fails to recognize and honor their past will never ever fully recognize the potential of their future,” said Wayne Brown, president of the Georgia Society of Sons of the American Revolution.----------

Carroll to honor its 17 veterans of the Revolutionary War

Ken Denney/Times-Georgian

Apr 22, 2017

After the American Revolution, when Carroll County was brand new and twice the size it is today, at least 17 veterans of America’s War for Independence moved here.
On April 30, those men will be recognized when a memorial wall will be dedicated in their honor at 2 p.m. at the Carroll County Veterans Memorial Park, 1050 Newnan Road. The Abraham Baldwin Chapter DAR, and the Casimir Pulaski Chapter SAR are sponsoring the event.
George Wheeless, president of Sons of the American Revolution chapter, has been involved in intense research on the lives of these men, all of whom moved to Carroll County in the decades following the war.
At the time of the American Revolution, 1775 to 1783, this region was part of the Creek Nation and not part of the then-colony of Georgia. After independence, a treaty with the Creeks signed in 1825 led to the division of Creek lands into five sections, the fifth of which eventually became Carroll County.
In that early incarnation, the county’s southern border followed the Chattahoochee River from near what is now Six Flags, southwesterly to what is now West Point, with the northern border stretching from Six Flags to the Alabama border, northwest of Buchanan in Haralson County.
This large, pizza wedge-shaped tract of land attracted many pioneers, including veterans of the Revolutionary War. Wheeless said he has been researching those 17 people he has thus far identified as war veterans who settled in the region, either as heads of households or who moved here as elderly members of an extended family.
About 250,000 men served as regulars or militiamen for the Revolutionary cause, but experts say there were never more than 90,000 soldiers under arms at any one time. Wheeless said it is possible that other veterans moved to the region, which in the centuries since has been carved up into Douglas, Haralson and Heard counties.
One way Wheeless has been identifying patriot soldiers is through pension records. In 1835, a four-volume reference work was published that identifies soldiers eligible for pensions due to their Revolutionary service. These records show the name of the soldier and information about their service.
But Wheeless said the information is not completely accurate, because to qualify for a pension, the veterans had to provide proof of their service. In many cases, Wheeless said, soldiers could not provide such evidence. Sometimes that was because a militia unit had kept their ranks a secret from the British.
So far, Wheeless has identified these men: John Barber, Peter Helton, Nimrod Jones, Levi Phillips Sr., Gabriel Smith, William Meryman, John Carmichael, Thomas Hinesley, Minor Mead, John Robinson Sr., Zachariah Stedham, Tobias Honea, Alexander Goggans, Lazarus Hinson, Jesse Peters, Jesse Rowell and William York.
Those names have been inscribed on a block of stone which will be unveiled during the April 30 ceremony.
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2009 News/Photos

Constitution Week proclaimed in City

Douglas County Sentinel

  • Sep 10, 2009

Mayor Mickey Thompson signs a proclamation declaring Sept. 17-Sept. 23 as Constitution Week in the city of Douglasville. Sept. 17 marks the 222nd anniversary of the drafting of the U.S. Constitution by the Constitutional Convention. The traditon of celebrating the Constitution was started by the Daughters of the American Revolution, who petitioned Congress in 1955 to set aside Sept. 17-23 annually for the observance. From left: JoAnn Colquitt, vice regent of the Sweetwater Chapter of the DAR, Mayor Thompson, David Martin, president of the Capt. John Collins Chapter of Marietta and Patricia Harrington, regent of the Sweetwater Chapter of DAR. (Helen McCoy/Sentinel)
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2007 News/Photos

SAR presents ‘living history’ to students

by Winston Jones Douglas County Sentinel

Aug 25, 2007 Updated Feb 17, 2021

Above: SAR presents "Living History" to students


Douglas County High School students got a “living” history lesson Friday as members of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) dressed in character to talk about patriotism and its symbols.SAR members recreated the history of the American flag, the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem for the morning assembly of student leaders and athletes. Shawn LaGrua, Georgia inspector general, also spoke to the group.SAR is a nonprofit patriotic organization with 26,000 members in 500 chapters located in the U.S. and several foreign countries. Members are descendants of the men and women who fought in the American Revolution. Members of the Sons of Liberty and Capt. John Collins SAR chapters presented Friday’s school show.“These are the symbols that represent patriotism,” said Kendall Abbott, SAR presenter. “Just like schools have mascots and companies have logos, our country has its symbols.”Abbott said these include the U.S. flag, a flower (the rose), a bird (bald eagle) and song (Star Spangled Banner).The American flag is believed to have been designed by Congressman Francis Hopkinson and put together by Philadelphia seamstress Betsy Ross. It was authorized by Congress on June 14, 1777, the basis of our Flag Day.The Pledge of Allegiance was first published in 1892 in the Boston based “The Youth’s Companion” magazine. It was written by the circulation manager Francis Bellamy and was suggested as a pledge to be repeated by students on Columbus Day that year, the 400th anniversary of the voyage. About 12 million students recited the words that day and it soon became a school day ritual. Congress recognized the pledge in 1942. The words “under God” were added in 1954.The “Star Spangled Banner,” our national anthem, was written in 1814 by attorney and amateur poet Francis Scott Key as he watched the bombardment of Ft. McHenry near Baltimore. The poem was first titled, “Defence of Fort M’Henry” and was printed in several newspapers. A Baltimore actor made it a song by adding the tune of “To Anacreon in Heaven,” a popular British song, and sang it on stage. It was sang as a patriotic song for many years and became the U.S. National Anthem in 1931.In her presentation, LaGrua urged the students to register and vote.“The greatest thing we have in this country is the right to vote,” she said. “It controls all our other rights. It’s the most important thing you can do.”LaGrua asked how many students planned to attend college and get a HOPE scholarship. A large number of hands were raised.“You know how to keep the HOPE scholarship?” she asked the crowd. “Vote for the people who support it. That’s how you voice your opinion.”The SAR presented several gifts to the school including a U.S. flag that has flown over the U.S. Capitol for Douglas County, compact disks (CDs) of history lessons and an autographed copy of a George Washington biography.SAR members participating in the ceremony, in addition to Abbott, included Larry Guzy, Allen Henson and Rodney Pritchett.The Douglas County High Junior ROTC Color Guard presented the colors.
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Aeneas Campbell Grave Marking Ceremony

April 28, 2007


On April 28, 2007, a grave marking dedication ceremony honoring Aeneas Campbell, American Revolutionary War patriot and four times Mike Campbell's great grandfather, was held at New Hope Baptist Church near Statesville, North Carolina.


New Hope Baptist Church near Statesville, North Carolina: Cemetery with dedication flags.
Dedication flags for the ceremony.
Aeneas Campbell, patriot: Four times Mike's great grandfather.
Elizabeth Ann Belt Campbell: Four times Mike's great grandmother and wife of patriot Aeneas Campbell.
Thomas Belt, Sr.: Father of four times Mike's great grandmother and a patriot of the revolution.
Sons of the American Revolution Color Guard representing four states: Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. George Wheeless (center) and Jim Swinson (far right) represented the Georgia Society and the Casimir Pulaski Color Guard.
George Wheeless, President of the Georgia Society Sons of the American Revolution, brings greetings to those gathered.
Sons of the American Revolution representing Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia.
Left to right: Mike Campbell, Caroline Campbell, Laura Campbell, and Christopher Campbell with Sons of the American Revolution Color Guard.
Four Campbell cousins (left to right): Larry Campbell of Harmony, North Carolina; John T. Campbell of Tennessee; Mike Campbell of Georgia; and Dan Campbell of Virginia. Mike indicates the four of them did not know each other prior to their research and that their paths crossed as they were all searching for the same ancestor. The four believed that they were connected based on the paper trail. The four subsequently did the DNA test which confirmed that they are cousins and that all four have Aeneas Campbell as their American Revolutionary War patriot ancestor.